The correct answer is the only one that uses the right subject-verbal convention and has the right grammar. For example, “reason” cannot be “directly correlated to something.” We can talk about “no students,” “a few students,” “most students,” “every student,” “every student,” or “all students.” It`s pretty easy to find – those with “students” are unique, and those with students are plural. This becomes more difficult when a sentence or amending clause intervenes (“no student, not even… “any student, including … “), but of course, if the names in the modifier are singular or if the plural does not affect the verb – the verb must correspond in number to the subject and only to the subject. The underlined part of the sentence contains a verb error with “runs.” “John and Susan,” while the two singular nouns are together a plural and require a plural form instead of singular “races.” “Run to the finish line” is the right answer choice. The verb “annoy” is used with the theme of “styles,” although the prepositional expression “leadership” and the adverb “frequently” are found between the two words. Therefore, the verb must adopt a plural form to match the subject. “Styles… “often angry” is the right answer form. The word “or” and its cousins “either… or” and “neither…

are a little more delicate. If both parts are singular, use a singular verb. If both parts are plural, use a plural verb. What if we have a singular term and a plural concept that is bound by “or” or one of its cousins? This is one of the rich and anti-intuitive rules of all grammar. If the two parts of a “or” construction differ in number, the number of verbs reflects the name closest to the verb. But how can we handle this if the GMAT gives us a more complicated sentence? The key is to divide it into mouth-appropriate pieces and address them individually, until you can clearly identify all the problems associated with thematic verb chord. Here is an example: in the first version, we replace the plural verb with a singular verb; in the second, the singular subject becomes plural by incorporating the amending sentence. Either we`re working here as a correction. Split #2: The three nouns parallel to “and” are a composite subject. This theme – Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard – requires a plural verb “were considered the founders.” The selection with the singular version, “was considered a founder,” is false. Decisions (B) – (C) – (E) make this mistake.

Not a single Nominus either; the verb “a” must agree. Now, ask what you`ve learned to work with the correcting question for the following GMAT sentence from Economist GMAT Tutors Bank of 5000: detecting a problem with the subject-verb relationship can really speed up our process in many GMAT corrections. Let`s take a look at some examples: the first step is to find out what the subject is. To identify the subject, ask yourself: who or what did the action? In this case, it means: who or what has the allusion? The answer to this question gives you the subject. In the passage above, “the article” alludes. The object of the sentence is the plural word “hopes.” Therefore, the singular “nudged” would be wrong. Scan the remaining response options to detect possible grammatical differences and errors. B has “Allude” while C has hints.